Posts Tagged ‘1964’

Peggy Lee – I’m In Love Again

(click song title above to listen)

Peggy Lee and composer Cy Coleman‘s artistic and personal relationship lasted for decades. From late night parties with pals Cary Grant & Dyan Cannon, to night club sets, tv specials & rewarding recording sessions birthing #1 Pop Hits such as her iconic rendition of Coleman/Fields’ “Big Spender“. Peggy added Cy to a distinguished group of collaborators in Victor Young, Harold Arlen, Duke Ellington, and Johnny Mandel linking her poetic lyrical abilities with Coleman’s compositional wizardry for a string of 1960s Lee-Coleman penned classics like “That’s My Style”, “Then Was Then and Now is Now”, and “That’s What it Takes”.

Lee routinely released two wholly new albums every year at Capitol Records between 1957-1972. This week’s tune is the title track from her first 1964 offering, another Coleman/Lee classic with punchy arrangements by Dick Hazard, Shorty Rogers and Bill Holeman considered some of the finest of her very prolific decade.

Check out this supremely moving 2009 rendition by Missy Higgins!

1280x1280 300x300 Peggy Lee   Im In Love Again

Publishing controlled by Notable Music Co. (Cy Coleman, Bill Schluger) / Contact: Damon Booth / info@notablemusic.net. Administered by Downtown Music Publishing (ASCAP) / contact: Sean McGraw/ seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com

Publishing controlled by Denslow Music, Inc. Inc (Peggy Lee) / Administered by Universal Music – MGB Songs (ASCAP) /
Master controlled by Capitol Records/UMG

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Barbra Streisand – When In Rome (I Do as the Romans Do)

(click song title above to listen)

Stephen Holden of the New York Times once said of Carolyn Leigh: “Leigh was Cy Coleman‘s greatest collaborator and the only major American lyricist whose bon mots consistently match Cole Porter’s in capturing an attitude of jaded sophistication fraught with heartbreak. The more pain is exposed, the sharper the wit that covers it up.”

“When In Rome (I Do as the Romans Do)” , one of the more playful of the long string of hits written by the duo, was beautifully debuted by Barbra Streisand on her 1964 album, People. This was Streisand’s fourth solo studio album and her first to hit #1 on the Billboard album chart, spending five weeks in the top spot on it’s way to platinum sales. The impeccable vocal delivery and lush bossa nova inspired production by Cy’s lifelong pal, Michael Berniker earned Barbra a Grammy award for Best Vocal Performance.

We know how a fundador can lead to a few, wishing you all a festive (& safe) summer!

MUDD7541 300x300 Barbra Streisand   When In Rome (I Do as the Romans Do)

Contact & Licensing info:
Publishing controlled by Notable Music Co.(Cy Coleman) / Contact: Damon Booth info@notablemusic.net. Administered by Downtown Music Publishing / contact: Sean McGraw seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
Publishing controlled by Carwin Music Co. Inc (Carolyn Leigh) / Administered by EMI U. Catalog Inc. / http://www.emimusicpub.com/licensing/index.php
Master controlled by Sony / http://hub.sonymusic.com/licensing/contact/

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Frank Sinatra – The Best Is Yet To Come

(click song title above to listen)

This week’s Top Tune is the very definition of a standard and the epitome of cool. This seductive Cy Coleman/Carolyn Leigh tune has been recorded by many greats including: Tony Bennett, Sarah Vaughan, Peggy Lee, Ella Fitzgerald, Michael Buble, and Patty Griffin (just to name a few), but it’s generally associated with Frank Sinatra, who recorded it on his 1964 album, It Might as Well Be Swing.

Sinatra was accompanied by Count Basie and his orchestra and it was the first Sinatra studio recording arranged by a little producer by the name of Quincy Jones. Just add Duke Ellington to the mix, you pretty much have the Mount Rushmore of Swing right there!

It was the last song Sinatra sang in public (Feb 25, 1995) and the words “The Best is Yet to Come” are etched on his tombstone. It’s one of his favorite songs, and one of ours too. The recording is simply lights out.

Available this week and in celebration of the centennial of his birth, Capitol Records presents, Ultimate Sinatra, a 100 song deluxe box set including this week’s tune, and two other Cy Coleman classics, “Witchcraft” (Coleman/Leigh), and “Why Try to Change Me Now” (Coleman/McCarthy). Get yours HERE.

81fgB6nZSvL. SX522  Frank Sinatra   The Best Is Yet To Come
Publishing controlled by Notable Music Co. (Cy Coleman). Contact: Damon Booth / info@notablemusic.net
Administered by Downtown Music Publishing
Contact: Sean McGraw / seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
Publishing controlled by Carwin Music Co. Inc (Carolyn Leigh)
Administered by Sony/ATV EMI U. Catalog Inc.
http://www.emimusicpub.com/licensing/index.php
Original Master Controlled by Warner Music Group http://www.wmgmusiclicensing.com

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Carmen McRae – I’m Gonna Laugh You Right Out of My Life

(click song title above to listen)

Carmen McRae is widely regarded as an artistic equal to Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, and Billie Holiday and she had a career that spanned five decades. Many consider her 1964 album, Bittersweet recorded for Mort Fega’s small independent label, Focus, her finest. We agree 100%, it’s one of our favorite late night/early morning records to put on the turntable.

Carmen McRae won an amateur talent contest at the Apollo Theater in her native Harlem neighborhood where she was discovered by jazz pianist Teddy Wilson. Trough Wilson, McRae would eventually meet Billie Holiday who became her biggest influence and who later recorded Carmen’s original composition “Dream of Life”. McRae later recalled, “If Billie Holiday had never existed, I probably wouldn’t have either”.

During a long and distinguished career McRae was recognized as a supremely insightful interpreter of lyrics. “Every word is very important to me,” she said. “Lyrics come first, then the melody. “The lyric of a song I might decide to sing must have something that I can convince you with. It’s like an actress who selects a role that contains something she wants to portray”.

On this week’s Top Tune, with her signature and soulful behind-the-beat vocal style, McRae accompanies herself on piano on the defiant “I’m Gonna Laugh You Right Out of My Life”. A song that lyricist Joe McCarthy initially envisioned as an uptempo, smart fast tune in the vein of “Just One of Those Things” until composer Cy Coleman talked him out of it. Coleman insisted “No. No. No. Joe. No you understand, it’s a ballad!” (excerpt from Andry Propst’s upcoming book, You Fascinate Me So, The Life & Times of Cy Coleman). Nat King Cole would prove Coleman correct and give the song its’ debut recording in 1957. In Carmen’s hands a few years later, it’s just as (bitter)sweet. Hope you dig it!

625621 300x300 Carmen McRae   Im Gonna Laugh You Right Out of My Life

Contact & Licensing Info:

Written by Cy Coleman & Joseph A. McCarthy. Published by Notable Music Co. Inc (ASCAP) contact: Damon Booth info@notablemusic.net, Administered by Downtown Music Publishing contact: seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com and Sony/ATV Tunes LLC (ASCAP).
Master Controlled by Warner Music Group http://www.wmgmusiclicensing.com

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