Posts Tagged ‘Carolyn Leigh’

Tony Bennett – I Walk A Little Faster

(click song title above to listen)

This lovely Cy Coleman/Carolyn Leigh song was once described as “the most romantic of all the tunes that speaks of New York City”. It was recorded in September 1964 for an album by Tony Bennett whose title track was a big hit during Bennett’s mid-1960s prime. Tony, always dedicated to discovering new songs and making standards out of them, tried each new tune out in clubs night after night. He worked them out before an audience and got to know them inside and out.

The album features The Ralph Sharon Trio and was arranged by the great Columbia Records staff arranger/conductor George Siravo. Siravo had been the prime driver of Frank Sinatra‘s transition away from ballads a few years ealier to the now legendary swinging uptempo approach the singer would pursue during the remainder of his recording career. Although credited to Nelson Riddle, Siravo actually did most of the arranging work for Sinatra’s first Capitol Records date and remained a premier arranger for Bennett, Doris Day, Rosemary Clooney, Vic Damone and many more.

You can watch a soul tugging performance of the tune by Fiona Apple HERE.

R 2733453 1377622936 7106.jpeg 293x300 Tony Bennett   I Walk A Little Faster

Contact & Licensing:
Published by Notable Music Co. ASCAP (Cy Coleman). Contact: Damon Booth / info@notablemusic.net
Administered by Downtown Music Publishing
Contact: Sean McGraw / seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
Published by Carwin Music Co. Inc ASCAP (Carolyn Leigh)
Administered by Sony/ATV – EMI U. Catalog Inc.
Master controlled by Sony Music Group.

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Barbara McNair – On the Other Side of the Tracks

(click song title above to listen)

“For those who know where The Niceness lives, they’ll find it’s moved in here. Twelve good songs rendered warm as the heart of a tree. All by Barbara, who’ll sing you no lies.” – Mel Torme

Barbara McNair‘s 1966 album I Enjoy Being a Girl was recorded in three distinct sessions. The first featured strings and a second, a tight-knit group of four trombones. The last included an impressive big, blowing, fifteen-man horn section that contains this week’s Top Tune.

“On the Other Side of the Tracks” with music by Cy Coleman, lyrics by Carolyn Leigh, was one of three written by the pair and masterfully recorded by McNair for the album. It would be the last project she would do for Warner Bros. Records before jumping ship to Motown.

McNair ended her Motown run with a pair of 1968 singles “Would I Be Without You” and “You Could Never Love Him” before turning her attention to a budding film & tv career. She would host her own syndicated variety series The Barbara McNair Show, co-star with Elvis Presley in the 1969 film Change of Habit, and prominently appear opposite Sidney Poitier in 1970′s They Call Me Mister Tibbs!. McNair continued to act and to headline nightclubs until her passing in 2007.

McNair 291x300 Barbara McNair   On the Other Side of the Tracks

Contact & Licensing Info
Published by Notable Music Co. ASCAP (Cy Coleman). Contact: Damon Booth / info@notablemusic.net
Administered by Downtown Music Publishing
Contact: Sean McGraw / seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
Published by Carwin Music Co. Inc ASCAP (Carolyn Leigh)
Administered by EMI U. Catalog Inc.
Master controlled by Warner Music Group.

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Ella Fitzgerald – Witchcraft

(click song title above to listen)

We celebrate the centennial of one of the best interpreters of song there ever was, the First Lady of Song, Miss Ella Fitzgerald! This week’s Top Tune was recorded live in Chicago on August 10, 1958 at Mister Kelly’s and features Lou Levy on piano, Max Bennett on bass, and Gus Johnson on drums. This must-hear set was remarkably one of the few live recordings of Fitzgerald captured in a small club.

The tune of course is the classic by Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh, the pair of Great American Songbook writers whose marvelous, witty, and sophisticated output also included The Best is Yet to Come, I’ve Got Your Number, I Walk A Little Faster, and The Rules of the Road just to name a few.

Born in Newport News, Virginia on April 25, 1917, Ella in her long and illustrious career won 13 Grammy Awards, A Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award, the National Medal of Arts, was inducted in the Down Beat magazine Hall of Fame, and received the Kennedy Center Honors for her contributions to the arts. If you had to pick one album that sums up her magic best, for our money it’s the 11 songs Ella and Louis Armstrong recorded one fine day in 1956 with the Oscar Petersen Quartet. Read all about that masterpiece HERE.

The GRAMMY Museum presents Ella at 100: Celebrating the Artistry of Ella Fitzgerald. The Exhibit opened yesterday and celebrates 100 years of Fitzgerald’s legacy through rare recordings, photos, and one-of-a-kind stage costumes. Click HERE for more info.

650be9bab127343333dfc8bd8b2d0618 300x232 Ella Fitzgerald   Witchcraft

Contact & Licensing Info
Published by Notable Music Co. ASCAP (Cy Coleman). Contact: Damon Booth / info@notablemusic.net
Administered by Downtown Music Publishing
Contact: Sean McGraw / seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
Published by MPL. Inc ASCAP (Carolyn Leigh)
Master controlled by Verve/Universal Music Group.

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Bob Dylan Sings Cy Coleman

dylan john shearer wide bfb46d4dacac0e52eacd363bd5ef40a5aa013d89 s1500 c85 1024x575 Bob Dylan Sings Cy ColemanHappy Release Day! Columbia Records brings you the latest from Bob Dylan, his first triple album. “Because as Frank Sinatra and Chet Baker and countless others knew, the concise songs of the Songbook era are magical self-renewing energy systems. In the space of just 32 measures, less than a minute, they lay out an idea or narrative, develop it, take it into a different tonality for the new perpective, and return home in a way that makes listeners want to take the ride again” – NPR.

Featuring classics by composers Cy Coleman (“The Best is Yet To Come“), Hoagy Carmichael (“Stardust”), Harold Arlen (“Stormy Weather”), Triplicate moves with great reverence and Dylan sings these at close range and at human scale. Read more HERE!

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