Posts Tagged ‘Columbia Records’

Bob Dylan – The Best is Yet to Come

(click song title above to listen)

Nobel Prize-winner Bob Dylan‘s third foray into tunes previously recorded by Frank Sinatra, Triplicate (4 1/2 Stars Rolling Stone), is a stunning collection of song-craft featuring standards by American masters including Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, Hoagy Carmichael, Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein, and Cy Coleman.

“These are recordings of breathtaking directness and beauty. There is nothing forced, no strain, no desire to put anything over on anybody or make a splash. Songs you may have thought you knew to the final decimal point you may feel you are hearing for the first time, transfigured. Not because of some dazzling new stylization or radically reimagined take on things; nobody here drew a moustache on the Mona Lisa. The singer on these recordings looks directly into the heart of each song, takes the measure of what it is about, and delivers it with such unaffected feeling and maturity and honesty that it can change you in the listening”. Tom Piazza (from the original liner notes). Hear, hear!

Bob Dylan (vocals), Tony Garnier (bass), Charlie Sexton (guitar), Donnie Herron (steel guitar), Dean Parks (guitar), George Receli (drums).

bobdylan 300x214 Bob Dylan   The Best is Yet to Come

Contact & Licensing:
Written by Cy Coleman & Carolyn Leigh.
Published by Notable Music Co. ASCAP (Cy Coleman). Contact: Damon Booth / info@notablemusic.net
Administered by Downtown Music Publishing
Contact: Sean McGraw / seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
Published by Carwin Music Co. Inc ASCAP (Carolyn Leigh)
Administered by Sony/ATV – EMI U. Catalog Inc.
Master controlled by Sony Music Group

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Pearl Bailey – Big Spender

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Born in 1918 in Newport News, VA, Pearl Bailey was more than an Emmy-winning actress and a singer. She was an author of six books, received a bachelor’s degree in theology from Georgetown University at the age of 67, and served as special ambassador to the United Nations. Last, but certainly not least, she was funny.

Bailey began singing and dancing in Philadelphia’s black nightclubs in the 1930s, opened for Cab Calloway and Duke Ellington in New York in the 1940s, and made her Broadway debut in St. Louis Woman in 1946. Bailey recorded a number of sides for Columbia Records in the 40s and didn’t return to the label until 1966 cutting “If My Friends Could See Me Now” and this week’s signature comedic take on “Big Spender”, both written by composer Cy Coleman and lyricist Dorothy Fields for the hit musical Sweet Charity.

pearl bailey big spender columbia 300x300 Pearl Bailey   Big Spender

Contact & Licensing info:
Published by Notable Music Co. (ASCAP) & Lida Enterprises (ASCAP). Contact: Damon Booth / info@notablemusic.net
Administered by Downtown Music Publishing.
Contact: Sean McGraw / seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
Master Controlled by Sony Music Group.

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Sylvia Syms – Poor Everybody Else

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Frank Sinatra loved saloon singers. In fact, it’s all he said that he wanted to be. One he loved most of all was the singer of this week’s top tune, Sylvia Syms. Syms sang tough, sentimental songs in joints in Harlem and on New York’s 52nd Street for years and as a teenager received informal training from the likes of Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, and Count Basie. Sinatra became such huge fan that he later personally conducted one of her albums.

This week’s tune was recorded by Sylvia for Columbia Records and released in support of composer Cy Coleman and lyricist Dorothy Fields‘ smash 1966 Broadway musical Sweet Charity. Columbia who also had the original cast album, went all out in its single’s barrage of the score. Recordings by Barbra Streisand (“Where Am I Going?”, “You Wanna Bet”), Tony Bennett (“Baby Dream Your Dream”), Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme (“If My Friends Could See Me Now”), Jerry Vale (“Too Many Tomorrows”) all notched Top 40 Easy Listening chart positions in time for the show’s debut on Broadway. Interestingly, “Poor Everybody Else” would be cut from this particular show but found a home a few years later in 1973′s Seesaw based on the William Gibson play, Two For the Seesaw.

sylvia syms poor everybody else columbia 300x300 Sylvia Syms   Poor Everybody Else

Contact & Licensing info:
Published by Notable Music Co. (ASCAP) & Aldi Music (ASCAP). Contact: Damon Booth / info@notablemusic.net
Administered by Downtown Music Publishing.
Contact: Sean McGraw / seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
Master Controlled by Sony Music Group.

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King’s Record Shop 30th Anniversary

rosanne cover with sticker1 d9602b77 94ea 435f 9b8b b2f7afaa25b4 1 Kings Record Shop 30th AnniversaryHappy Release Day! Sony Legacy celebrates the 30th Anniversary of Rosanne Cash‘s pioneering LP King’s Record Shop with a special edition 180-gram vinyl release and digital download with bonus tracks. Released on June 26, 1987, the album would prove a pivotal one not only in the career of Cash, but in the emergence of Americana as an heir to traditional country music. The set would also have the distinction of marking the first time a female artist had ever had four #1 singles on the Billboard Country charts from a single record. Cash’s covers of her father’s “Tennessee Flat Top Box”, John Hiatt’s “The Way We Make A Broken Heart”, John Stewart’s “Runaway Train” as well as “If You Change Your Mind,” a song she’d written with steel guitar player Hank DeVito, all climbed to the top of the chart.

Produced by Rodney Crowell (Rosanne’s then-husband), the set features a stellar band of players including Crowell, Vince Gill, Patty Smyth, Benmont Tench, Steve Winwood, and Randy Scruggs.

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