Posts Tagged ‘Cy Coleman’

Nancy Wilson – Why Try to Change Me Now

(click song title above to listen)

Signed to Capitol Records in 1960, Welcome To My Love was Nancy Wilson‘s twentieth lp for Capitol in less than eight years. As with other strong sellers like Nat King Cole, Al Martino, and George Shearing, the label turned her into a recording machine churning out four albums a year. Most of them packaged this R&B singer in slick commercial settings but this album takes her a lot closer to home.

Recorded on November 3rd, 1967 at Capitol Studios and with charts by St. Louis-born arranger-composer Oliver Nelson, each track is anchored by a tight rhythm section and in the words of James Gavin of the New York Times, “the brass is lean and articulate, the strings never cloy. Rarely has a singer given a program from the masters – Rodgers and Hart, Cy Coleman, Sammy Cahn, more bite than Wilson”.

The tune is by Cy Coleman with lyrics by Joseph McCarthy and was the ballad that launched Cy as a pop composer. Sinatra cut it first for Columbia in the mid-1950s and it went on to find a permanent home in the saloon songbook. Check out these poignant renditions from Fiona Apple and Bob Dylan!

MI0000054308 295x300 Nancy Wilson   Why Try to Change Me Now

Contact & Licensing Info
Written by Cy Coleman & Joseph A. McCarthy. Published by Notable Music Co. Inc (ASCAP)
Contact: Damon Booth info@notablemusic.net, Administered by Downtown Music Publishing contact: seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
For Joseph McCarthy: Sony/ATV Tunes LLC (ASCAP).
Master controlled by Capitol Records/Universal Music Group.

+
no comments

The Life Shines in London

C qT bnWsAEkRYu 1024x512 The Life Shines in LondonCongratulations to The Southwark Playhouse, Director Michael Blakemore, the magnificent Sharon D Clarke, Cornell S. John, and entire cast and creative team behind the outstanding UK run of Cy Coleman‘s gem of a musical, The Life!

+
no comments

Ella Fitzgerald – Witchcraft

(click song title above to listen)

We celebrate the centennial of one of the best interpreters of song there ever was, the First Lady of Song, Miss Ella Fitzgerald! This week’s Top Tune was recorded live in Chicago on August 10, 1958 at Mister Kelly’s and features Lou Levy on piano, Max Bennett on bass, and Gus Johnson on drums. This must-hear set was remarkably one of the few live recordings of Fitzgerald captured in a small club.

The tune of course is the classic by Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh, the pair of Great American Songbook writers whose marvelous, witty, and sophisticated output also included The Best is Yet to Come, I’ve Got Your Number, I Walk A Little Faster, and The Rules of the Road just to name a few.

Born in Newport News, Virginia on April 25, 1917, Ella in her long and illustrious career won 13 Grammy Awards, A Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award, the National Medal of Arts, was inducted in the Down Beat magazine Hall of Fame, and received the Kennedy Center Honors for her contributions to the arts. If you had to pick one album that sums up her magic best, for our money it’s the 11 songs Ella and Louis Armstrong recorded one fine day in 1956 with the Oscar Petersen Quartet. Read all about that masterpiece HERE.

The GRAMMY Museum presents Ella at 100: Celebrating the Artistry of Ella Fitzgerald. The Exhibit opened yesterday and celebrates 100 years of Fitzgerald’s legacy through rare recordings, photos, and one-of-a-kind stage costumes. Click HERE for more info.

650be9bab127343333dfc8bd8b2d0618 300x232 Ella Fitzgerald   Witchcraft

Contact & Licensing Info
Published by Notable Music Co. ASCAP (Cy Coleman). Contact: Damon Booth / info@notablemusic.net
Administered by Downtown Music Publishing
Contact: Sean McGraw / seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
Published by MPL. Inc ASCAP (Carolyn Leigh)
Master controlled by Verve/Universal Music Group.

+
no comments

Marian Montgomery – Love Is An Old Maid’s Dream

(click song title above to listen)

David Cavanaugh‘s unremittingly swinging arrangements for this album highlight a top notch band featuring brass by Dave Wells and Milt Bernhart, Plas Johnson on tenor sax, and Jack Marshall and Bob Bain on guitars. Recorded at Capitol’s Studio A in August of 1964, this week’s top tune by Cy Coleman and Joseph McCarthy also features Coleman himself on the piano.

The singer is Marian Montgomery who hails from Natchez Mississippi and began her career performing in clubs in Atlanta and Chicago. Her big break came when Peggy Lee was listening to her audition tape in the company of an A&R man from Capitol Records suggesting “forget the song and sign the singer”! Montgomery released three albums on Capitol in the early to mid 1960s and counted Nat King Cole and Frank Sinatra among her fans before marrying English pianist Laurie Holloway and relocating to the UK.

Marian became resident singer throughout the 1970s on a hit British chat show hosted by Michael Parkinson and continued to perform sold-out club shows until her death in 2002. The Guardian claimed glowingly “she was possessed of a sumptuously elegant, lingeringly low-lit voice, a subtle understanding of jazz time, and an alertness to the musicians around her.” Check her out for yourself right HERE.

Marian+Montgomery+Lovin+Is+Livin+And+Livin+Is+Lo 535146 300x298 Marian Montgomery   Love Is An Old Maids Dream

Contact & Licensing info:
Published by Notable Music Co. (ASCAP) Contact: Damon Booth / info@notablemusic.net
Administered by Downtown Music Publishing.
Contact: Sean McGraw / seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
For Joseph McCarthy: Sony/ATV Tunes LLC (ASCAP).
Master Controlled by Universal Music Group.

+
no comments