Posts Tagged ‘Frank Sinatra’

Frank Sinatra – Witchcraft

(click song title above to listen)

Frank Sinatra‘s recording of Witchcraft (Coleman/Leigh) received 6 Grammy Award nominations at the first ever Grammy Awards in 1957 including Song of the Year, Record of the Year, Album of the Year, Best Vocal Performance (male), and Best Arrangement (Nelson Riddle)

Sinatra would re-record the song in 1963 for his Reprise lp, Sinatra’s Sinatra and again in 1993 as a duet with Anita Baker on a record that would go on to sell over 3 million copies.

The tune has gone on to become a pop and jazz standard, recorded by the likes of Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, Oscar Peterson, and Bill Evans just to name a few.

Sinatra, at the encouragement of his daughter, Nancy, scored a coup in the Spring of 1960, when he booked Elvis Presley to appear on his tv special, The Frank Sinatra Timex Show: Welcome Home Elvis. Elvis was the only star who shone with anything like Frank’s intensity, and his return to the public spotlight from a two year stint in the Army was a big, big, draw. You can catch the performance where Frank sings a swinging version of Elvis’ hit song “Love Me Tender” intertwined with Presley singing Sinatra’s “Witchcraft” in HBO’s stellar new documentary, Elvis Presley: The Searcher (airing now). The moment when two of the biggest legends in the music business harmonize together at the end of the duet is a historic moment never to be forgotten.

1515711017337d7775ff249e0c34e0a221a0fb831e 300x256 Frank Sinatra   Witchcraft

Contact & Licensing Info
Written by Cy Coleman & Carolyn Leigh
Published by Notable Music Co. ASCAP (Cy Coleman)
Contact: Damon Booth/info@notablemusic.net
Administered by Big Deal Music Group
Contact: Jennifer Falco/jennifer@bigdealmusicgroup.com
Published by Edwin H. Morris Co. ASCAP (Carolyn Leigh)
Administered by MPL Communications Inc.
Master controlled by Universal Music Group.

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Bob Dylan – Why Try To Change Me Now

(click song title above to listen)


Three years ago this week, Bob Dylan tipped his hat to Frank Sinatra with his critically acclaimed 36th studio album for Columbia Records, Shadows In The Night. The intimate album was done live in one or two takes and recorded in famed Capitol Studio B, where the Chairman had recorded so much of his classic work. Shadows consists of ballads recorded by Frank in the late 50s and 60s, songs that explored the emotions of heartache and melancholy. The album debuted at #1 on the UK Album charts and at #7 on the Billboard Top 200 and was nominated for “Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album” at the 58th Annual Grammy Awards.

Because there were no earphones or overdubs used in the recording, engineer Al Schmitt moved the musicians (Tony Garnier – double bass, Donny Herron – pedal steel, Charlie Sexton – electric guitar, Stu Kimball – acoustic guitar, George Receli – drums) around in the room in a semicircle around Dylan who was facing them to get the right balance in the room. “I used Capitol’s Neumann U47 on Bob’s vocals. The very same microphone that was used on Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Nat King Cole. I’ve used it on Paul McCartney and Diana Krall too.” says Al.

“Bob loves these songs and put his heart and soul into singing them. If there was something slightly off-pitch it didn’t matter, because his soul was there and he laid the songs open and bare the way they are.” continued Schmitt. Stunning all around!

LDD796141 300x300 Bob Dylan   Why Try To Change Me Now

Contact & Licensing Info
Written by Cy Coleman & Joseph A. McCarthy. Published by Notable Music Co. Inc (ASCAP)
Contact: Damon Booth info@notablemusic.net, Administered by Big Deal Music Group contact: Jennifer Falco/jennifer@bigdealmusicgroup.com
For Joseph McCarthy: Sony/ATV Tunes LLC (ASCAP).
Master controlled by Sony Music Group.

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Fiona Apple – Why Try to Change Me Now

(click song title above to listen)

So let people wonder
Let ‘em laugh
Let ‘em frown
You know I’ll love you
Till the moon’s upside down
Don’t you remember
I was always your clown
Why try to change me now

“Why Try To Change Me Now” was one of Cy Coleman‘s first major hits… recorded in 1959 by a ‘lil crooner named Frank Sinatra. Over the years such diverse artists as Sammy Davis Jr with Count Basie, Bob Dylan, and Elvin Jones have recorded beautifully unique interpretations of this classic ballad. Fiona’s 2009 reading absolutely floors anyone who listens, and she tackles the tune in a way that truly makes it her own. Apple’s vocals, as per usual, are stunning – that mix of vulnerability and confidence that only she can exude. We are honored that she chose to cut this and another Cy classic (“I Walk A Little Faster”) for The Best Is Yet to Come, The Songs of Cy Coleman tribute album.

tumblr mbbmdfFR6m1r7uiu5o1 5001 300x199 Fiona Apple   Why Try to Change Me Now

Contact & Licensing Info
Written by Cy Coleman & Joseph A. McCarthy. Published by Notable Music Co. Inc (ASCAP)
Contact: Damon Booth info@notablemusic.net, Administered by Downtown Music Publishing contact: seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
For Joseph McCarthy: Sony/ATV Tunes LLC (ASCAP).
Master controlled by Notable Music Co. Inc.

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Sylvia Syms – Poor Everybody Else

(click song title above to listen)

Frank Sinatra loved saloon singers. In fact, it’s all he said that he wanted to be. One he loved most of all was the singer of this week’s top tune, Sylvia Syms. Syms sang tough, sentimental songs in joints in Harlem and on New York’s 52nd Street for years and as a teenager received informal training from the likes of Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, and Count Basie. Sinatra became such huge fan that he later personally conducted one of her albums.

This week’s tune was recorded by Sylvia for Columbia Records and released in support of composer Cy Coleman and lyricist Dorothy Fields‘ smash 1966 Broadway musical Sweet Charity. Columbia who also had the original cast album, went all out in its single’s barrage of the score. Recordings by Barbra Streisand (“Where Am I Going?”, “You Wanna Bet”), Tony Bennett (“Baby Dream Your Dream”), Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme (“If My Friends Could See Me Now”), Jerry Vale (“Too Many Tomorrows”) all notched Top 40 Easy Listening chart positions in time for the show’s debut on Broadway. Interestingly, “Poor Everybody Else” would be cut from this particular show but found a home a few years later in 1973′s Seesaw based on the William Gibson play, Two For the Seesaw.

sylvia syms poor everybody else columbia 300x300 Sylvia Syms   Poor Everybody Else

Contact & Licensing info:
Published by Notable Music Co. (ASCAP) & Aldi Music (ASCAP). Contact: Damon Booth / info@notablemusic.net
Administered by Downtown Music Publishing.
Contact: Sean McGraw / seanmcgraw@dmpgroup.com
Master Controlled by Sony Music Group.

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